See page 2 for OVER-OILING RECTIFICATION

Natural Plant Oils penetrate deep into timbers. Light also travels with the oils along the timber fibres into the wood, enhancing all the colour, glow and character of the structure. When the light reflects back it will however reveal any imperfections in the surface sanding. By using Wet on Wet friction sanding technique you will be able to minimise sanding imperfections.

Step 1:
Fine sand timbers to minimum 400 grit (powered disc) or hand sand to 600 grit WET & DRY paper. Sand until timber begins to show a slight lustre. Retain the sawdust in the last paper used - do not dust off as it will be used as a grain filler in the next process.

Step 2:
Apply first coat of Oil to all surfaces of the project including the underside and or rearside allowing the oil time to soak well into the timber; 2 – 3 hours later ( not overnight ) apply a light second coat after first application to the surfaces to be burnished also allowing a short time for oil to be absorbed. Wipe off excess or pooling oil leaving a moist surface , then begin to massage or burnish the oil into the timber surface with the last paper used in Step 1. The Oil & sawdust will form a slurry & should be worked to fill the pore structure of the timber, if needing more slurry to close the pores of the timber, add oil only to the surface of the paper being used. Should you have an excess of slurry clean the face of the paper with an Oil dampened cloth making sure not to add Oil to the timber surface. By now you should have achieved a satin finish across the surface. Wipe excess slurry from timber surface with clean dry cloth or paper towel before moving to Step 3. NB Put the lid back on the can to resist the temptation of adding more oil to the timber.

Step 3:
To obtain a higher lustre than a satin finish, carry on sanding (manual or power) using 1200 grit wet and dry paper. Two to three sandings with 1200 grit paper may be necessary to bring up the desired finish. Paper face should at all times remain clean and free from excess slurry Should paper face be oily, wipe timber surface with paper towel or serviette and change to a new paper. Note: For cabinetry finish it is highly recommended to continue burnishing at 1500, 2000 grit wet and dry paper—guaranteed to put a “gleam” in the finish.

Step 4:
To achieve the “ultimate” with an oil finish it is necessary to leave for 24 to 48 hours and then power buff with lambswool or lint free cloth.

NOTE: Project should remain to cure in a well ventilated area free of condensation and moisture. Benchtops and table tops should not be exposed to water or heat for at least 3 - 4 days. To avoid rust marking do not leave "wet" tin cans on benchtops overnight.

BENCH TOP/TABLE TOP MAINTENANCE
Normal day to day care -

- Wipe down with a soft damp cloth (do not use harsh detergents or cleaners) then dry off with a soft lint free cloth.
- Should the surface become dull or dry looking, rejuvenate with Organoil Woodsheen.
- Spray or wipe on a light coat, leave for 10-20 minutes and then buff with a clean, soft lint free cloth.
- Allow 4-6 hours before using area.



Page 2


OVER-OILING RECTIFICATION

ORGANOIL products are 100% oil in the can, therefore in most instances 2 COATS ONLY are required unless otherwise specified. The addition of more coats of oil will not improve the lustre (shine) and may in many cases result in a dull and patchy appearance. Should your project exhibit the above finish it will be because oil has been added through the polishing procedure thereby continuing to wash out the slurry filler and also the surface of the timber will be too wet when using the polishing grit papers (1200, 1500, 2000). Therefore, there will not be enough heat generated to glaze the oil at the timber surface.



STEP 1
Re-sand timber surface to 220 grit paper to breakdown excess oil at the surface.

STEP 2
Move to 320/400 grit (power disc) or hand sand to 600 grit Wet and Dry paper, continue sanding until timber surface is smooth all over. Should the paper face clog with old slurry, clean down with oil dampened cloth.

STEP 3
Apply a coating of oil to timber surface allowing time to penetrate (approximately 10-20 mins). Carry on burnishing with previous paper used this will generate a “slurry” which should be worked to a consistency of peanut butter.

If needing more slurry to close the pores of the timber or should the slurry become powdery, add more oil ONLY to the surface of the paper being used.

By now you should have achieved a satin finish (lustre) across the surface. Wipe excess slurry from timber surface with clean dry cloth or paper towel before moving to Step 4.

STEP 4
Do not apply any more oil!
Move to 1200 grit Wet and Dry paper and carry on burnishing (now polishing). Two or three burnishing with new paper may be necessary to bring up the desired finish.

Note: Paper face should at all times remain clean and free from excess oil and slurry.

STEP 5
If seeking an even higher lustre it is recommended to continue burnishing using 1500/2000 grit papers.

STEP 6
Allow the oiled surface 24-48 hours to cure then power buff with lambs wool pad.

Allow 96 hours before using water near finish.